Tag: sound

‘Your voices in my head (and mine in yours)’ Liquid Architecture and Lin Chi-Wei

‘Your voices in my head (and mine in yours)’ Liquid Architecture and Lin Chi-Wei

Liquid Architecture is an Australian organisation for artists working with sound. LA investigates the sounds themselves, but also the ideas communicated about, and the meaning of, sound and listening.

I packed in quite a few gallery shows this weekend, the closing or moving I should say of  Melbourne staple, the Gertrude Contemporary, the new show ‘Lets Dance‘ at Arts Project Australia and popped to Blak Dot Gallery , and Arts House for Yirramboi Festival.

And, to top it off I headed to Liquid Architecture’s annual project Polyphonic Social, which encourages artists and participants to expand on polyphony, and its potential within a group environment. Polyphony is the hearing of 2 or more individual voices/melodies simultaneously, within a given structure.

An excerpt from the Liquid Architectures site explains that ” Polyphonics have much artistic and social potential: to make difference audible, to ‘sound’ disobedience, choreograph dissonance, and explore the harmonies possible when we bring voices together (and apart) in a shared space.’ I really like this idea of making difference audible, rather than visual, and the potential for its orchestration unbeknownst to the participant.

Taiwanese sound artist Lin Chi-Wei, orchestrated 2 projects at Liquid Architecture. The first being ‘Tape Music’ a live performance which has been performed internationally since its 2008. Where by participants sit in a spiral, a 200m long ribbon is fed from the beginning of the spiral and moves to the centre where it rests, the ribbon has different sounds, like ‘Wu’ ‘Om’, embroidered onto which are to be vocalised by each participant as the ribbon passes through there hands. Much like a cassette tape!

I really enjoyed participating in this, it felt like a gift. I enjoyed a brief chat with the strangers to the left and right of me, we felt a combination of intrigue and apprehension. Throughout the performance there were points where I honed in on the sounds, pitch and tone of others, making an effort to match or compliment them subconsciously. And, other times fully aware of my sound, my presence and its part in the polyphonic piece.

To view the recording of ‘Tape Music’ at Liquid Architecture click here.

 

Liquid Architecture Events

Lin Chi-Wei works

Charlemagne Palestine + reading youtube comments

Charlemagne Palestine + reading youtube comments

A Youtube comment worth reading, “Open up four tabs with the music playing at the same time at different times for the ultimate experience”

I did it. it was amazing.

My first exploration into Charlemagne Palestine’s music, contemporary of Philip Glass, and Steve Reich – was the visceral ‘Body Music”, but this comment relates to ‘Strumming Music‘. A piano piece which builds, layer upon layer, loops, steps back and forth, it both hurries and relaxes all at the same time. Filling the space between the beat with a strumming technique where by a note seems to chase its tail, to whirl and spin around, shifting into the next.

What brought me to him was this…..

Charlemagne_Palestine_17_-®_Maximilian_Pramatarov.jpg
Charlemagne Palestine at Kunsthalle Wien

But I think I like his music equally. Both immersive, both soft yet aggressive in their clustering or packing, both full of visual or sonic texture and colour.

I do know why the teddy bear developed as a motif, I’m interested in Charlemagne Palestine’s alignment with Animism more so than the bear itself.

The more I read about him, his interest in animism, his intention to exist on the outskirts, to not be considered an any ‘thing’ in particular, a rejection of categorisation. And also the fact that he was involved in the beginning of the CalArts school, much like Judy Chicago and a number of other artists I seem to be drawn too. I’m looking forward to investigating further and seeing who else appears with rebellious inclinations.

Heres a great interview on The Quietus

Continuo blog breaks down sound, here