Tag: installation

Peter Sarkisian – Neo Folk Art?

Peter Sarkisian – Neo Folk Art?

American artist Peter Sarkisian, uses sculpture and video projection in a bid to turn how we have been trained to watch video imagery through television, into an experience of self awareness, where we are no longer solely watching, but actively consider the experience.

He’s most recent body of work, VideoMorphic sees intricate and high contrasting hues projected onto 3-D printed sculptures. Its seems quite perverse. Its so unusual because in one instance I can understand it, I know its a 3-D surface with a projection on it, but once the projection begins it takes on a whole new level, I cannot join the plain colour surface, with the surface during projection with all its apparent moving elements. I guess this is Peter Sarkisians intention. I became aware of what I understand, but feel what I understand is not accurately assisting me in processing the new experience.

Could this be considered a type of new folk art? I will have to think about that…

I also like the work below, Pounding Study from 2004, Its worth watching the video.

 

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Peter Sarkisian: Pounding Study, 2004
Chris Martin

Chris Martin

Excerpt taken from an interview with Jennifer Sammat on Hyperallergic.com:

“If you ask a bunch of college students, “Is anybody here an artist?” most will say, “Oh, I can’t paint, I don’t know.” Everyone is embarrassed. But, if you put on some music, and say, “Anybody want to dance?” well, everybody can dance. No one says, “I haven’t really studied dance.” People get up and they have a good time. I’m just saying — that’s good! In the art world, we could all dance a little. Dancing’s fun.” This statements contrasts with the current Arts Project Australia exhibition, ‘Lets Dance’ where dance is the subject of some peoples anxieties. I don’t intend to discredit this, but quote is a means to convey a message.

Martin experienced a level of preciousness towards painting on a canvas, that he didn’t have with drawings on paper. A habit he broke through experimentation and adopting a level of fearlessness he could see within his clients/students at work.

With a background in Arts Therapy, Chris Martin had been (and possibly still is) in the presence of some rather great self taught artists. He felt their energetic channelling of creativity contrasted greatly to his formal arts training, causing a necessary rupture in his practise. His work environment provided an arena to experiment with alternative materials like pom-poms and metallic paint and glitter.

Chris Martin, Untitled, 2014
Untitled, 2014

He paints XXXL, creating what some consider ‘severe abstract’ space to mill around in, and when the mind wonders a touch, its still wonders within the XXXL canvas. Interestingly he considers himself a landscape painter, and includes what he views as a  horizon or ground line in each work.

Chris Martin you caught my eye because of your use of glitter, sheer scale, boldness and sense of journey within your work. I found you in this aptly named artspace.com article:

Glitter, Neon and Good Old Fashioned Paint: Three Abstract Painters Pushing the Medium Forward.

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The publication above reminds me of all the things I find interesting about some Chinese advertising: layout, scale, changeable font styles and colour combinations.

Featured Image from Artnet.com

Hyperallergic.com interview