Tag: experimental

Phil Brophy – Tripper

Phil Brophy – Tripper

I wasn’t expecting this! Neon Parc is an upstairs gallery space in the heart of Melbourne.

Philip Brophy – Evaporated Music

In the few seconds it took to enter the gallery and take a few steps up the stairs, the conversation stopped, the heavy bass and near incomprehensible vocals, coming from the gallery space, made me reconsider entering the gallery, and I fell into a sort of fight mode.

A few steps more, and a glance to the left – a large, comfortable yet generic sofa, facing a flat screen tv, both flanked by speakers. Visually inviting, an assuming safe and comfortable space.  I felt held by the opposing visual and audible aspects. The TV showed a familiar American teen television show from the 90’s/2000’s, dubbed with black metal words and lyrics and dark guttural sounds, with supporting subtitles. What I could see and what I could here, were so conflicting, almost unbelievable. Certainly something to be experienced. After 20 mins I left, and once outside, I felt so very calm.

After doing some research into Phil Brophy turns out he made Body Melt, which is a great face melting montage of a film.
bodymelt copy

His website, much like some of his work that I am familiar with feels a pretty punk! Theres a real sense of attitude, strong intentions and a individual way of making a mark across sound, film, graphics, music and art.

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Last two images taken from the Philip Brophy website.

Featured image from Ocula.com

Phil Brophy’s ‘Colour Me Dead’ exhibition at The Ian Potter Museum of Art, is coming up shortly, so Im sure I will write about that.

 

‘Your voices in my head (and mine in yours)’ Liquid Architecture and Lin Chi-Wei

‘Your voices in my head (and mine in yours)’ Liquid Architecture and Lin Chi-Wei

Liquid Architecture is an Australian organisation for artists working with sound. LA investigates the sounds themselves, but also the ideas communicated about, and the meaning of, sound and listening.

I packed in quite a few gallery shows this weekend, the closing or moving I should say of  Melbourne staple, the Gertrude Contemporary, the new show ‘Lets Dance‘ at Arts Project Australia and popped to Blak Dot Gallery , and Arts House for Yirramboi Festival.

And, to top it off I headed to Liquid Architecture’s annual project Polyphonic Social, which encourages artists and participants to expand on polyphony, and its potential within a group environment. Polyphony is the hearing of 2 or more individual voices/melodies simultaneously, within a given structure.

An excerpt from the Liquid Architectures site explains that ” Polyphonics have much artistic and social potential: to make difference audible, to ‘sound’ disobedience, choreograph dissonance, and explore the harmonies possible when we bring voices together (and apart) in a shared space.’ I really like this idea of making difference audible, rather than visual, and the potential for its orchestration unbeknownst to the participant.

Taiwanese sound artist Lin Chi-Wei, orchestrated 2 projects at Liquid Architecture. The first being ‘Tape Music’ a live performance which has been performed internationally since its 2008. Where by participants sit in a spiral, a 200m long ribbon is fed from the beginning of the spiral and moves to the centre where it rests, the ribbon has different sounds, like ‘Wu’ ‘Om’, embroidered onto which are to be vocalised by each participant as the ribbon passes through there hands. Much like a cassette tape!

I really enjoyed participating in this, it felt like a gift. I enjoyed a brief chat with the strangers to the left and right of me, we felt a combination of intrigue and apprehension. Throughout the performance there were points where I honed in on the sounds, pitch and tone of others, making an effort to match or compliment them subconsciously. And, other times fully aware of my sound, my presence and its part in the polyphonic piece.

To view the recording of ‘Tape Music’ at Liquid Architecture click here.

 

Liquid Architecture Events

Lin Chi-Wei works

Peter Sarkisian – Neo Folk Art?

Peter Sarkisian – Neo Folk Art?

American artist Peter Sarkisian, uses sculpture and video projection in a bid to turn how we have been trained to watch video imagery through television, into an experience of self awareness, where we are no longer solely watching, but actively consider the experience.

He’s most recent body of work, VideoMorphic sees intricate and high contrasting hues projected onto 3-D printed sculptures. Its seems quite perverse. Its so unusual because in one instance I can understand it, I know its a 3-D surface with a projection on it, but once the projection begins it takes on a whole new level, I cannot join the plain colour surface, with the surface during projection with all its apparent moving elements. I guess this is Peter Sarkisians intention. I became aware of what I understand, but feel what I understand is not accurately assisting me in processing the new experience.

Could this be considered a type of new folk art? I will have to think about that…

I also like the work below, Pounding Study from 2004, Its worth watching the video.

 

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Peter Sarkisian: Pounding Study, 2004
Chris Martin

Chris Martin

Excerpt taken from an interview with Jennifer Sammat on Hyperallergic.com:

“If you ask a bunch of college students, “Is anybody here an artist?” most will say, “Oh, I can’t paint, I don’t know.” Everyone is embarrassed. But, if you put on some music, and say, “Anybody want to dance?” well, everybody can dance. No one says, “I haven’t really studied dance.” People get up and they have a good time. I’m just saying — that’s good! In the art world, we could all dance a little. Dancing’s fun.” This statements contrasts with the current Arts Project Australia exhibition, ‘Lets Dance’ where dance is the subject of some peoples anxieties. I don’t intend to discredit this, but quote is a means to convey a message.

Martin experienced a level of preciousness towards painting on a canvas, that he didn’t have with drawings on paper. A habit he broke through experimentation and adopting a level of fearlessness he could see within his clients/students at work.

With a background in Arts Therapy, Chris Martin had been (and possibly still is) in the presence of some rather great self taught artists. He felt their energetic channelling of creativity contrasted greatly to his formal arts training, causing a necessary rupture in his practise. His work environment provided an arena to experiment with alternative materials like pom-poms and metallic paint and glitter.

Chris Martin, Untitled, 2014
Untitled, 2014

He paints XXXL, creating what some consider ‘severe abstract’ space to mill around in, and when the mind wonders a touch, its still wonders within the XXXL canvas. Interestingly he considers himself a landscape painter, and includes what he views as a  horizon or ground line in each work.

Chris Martin you caught my eye because of your use of glitter, sheer scale, boldness and sense of journey within your work. I found you in this aptly named artspace.com article:

Glitter, Neon and Good Old Fashioned Paint: Three Abstract Painters Pushing the Medium Forward.

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The publication above reminds me of all the things I find interesting about some Chinese advertising: layout, scale, changeable font styles and colour combinations.

Featured Image from Artnet.com

Hyperallergic.com interview

Charlemagne Palestine + reading youtube comments

Charlemagne Palestine + reading youtube comments

A Youtube comment worth reading, “Open up four tabs with the music playing at the same time at different times for the ultimate experience”

I did it. it was amazing.

My first exploration into Charlemagne Palestine’s music, contemporary of Philip Glass, and Steve Reich – was the visceral ‘Body Music”, but this comment relates to ‘Strumming Music‘. A piano piece which builds, layer upon layer, loops, steps back and forth, it both hurries and relaxes all at the same time. Filling the space between the beat with a strumming technique where by a note seems to chase its tail, to whirl and spin around, shifting into the next.

What brought me to him was this…..

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Charlemagne Palestine at Kunsthalle Wien

But I think I like his music equally. Both immersive, both soft yet aggressive in their clustering or packing, both full of visual or sonic texture and colour.

I do know why the teddy bear developed as a motif, I’m interested in Charlemagne Palestine’s alignment with Animism more so than the bear itself.

The more I read about him, his interest in animism, his intention to exist on the outskirts, to not be considered an any ‘thing’ in particular, a rejection of categorisation. And also the fact that he was involved in the beginning of the CalArts school, much like Judy Chicago and a number of other artists I seem to be drawn too. I’m looking forward to investigating further and seeing who else appears with rebellious inclinations.

Heres a great interview on The Quietus

Continuo blog breaks down sound, here

 

Set Theory – Francis Alys

Set Theory – Francis Alys

 

The ‘New York Triptych’ always sits in the back of my mind. Primarily its the execution of the two paintings by the sign writers, and secondary to that is Francis Alys concept.

Watch the video for ‘Set Theory’ here.

 

Sigmar Polke

Sigmar Polke

Polkes capacity and drive to cross mediums and experiment with materials are very inspirational.

‘Polke’s notoriously multidisciplinary approach produced an expansive oeuvre, marked by promiscuity in material and medium as well as an absence of identifiable style, yet all the while bearing the hallmark of his inimitable spirit as playful provocateur.’ From Nahmad Contemporary.

 

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Fensterfront, 1994
 

 

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To create this work, Polke has very simply adapted his environment.

 

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Libespaar II [Lovers II] 1965, Oil on canvas

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Affen 1974 Dispersion and spray enamel on canvas
References:

Tate

Alex Kittle Blog

Nahmad Contemporary

Book: Alibis, Sigmar Polke, 1963-2010, MoMA