Tag: Energy

Chris Martin

Chris Martin

Excerpt taken from an interview with Jennifer Sammat on Hyperallergic.com:

“If you ask a bunch of college students, “Is anybody here an artist?” most will say, “Oh, I can’t paint, I don’t know.” Everyone is embarrassed. But, if you put on some music, and say, “Anybody want to dance?” well, everybody can dance. No one says, “I haven’t really studied dance.” People get up and they have a good time. I’m just saying — that’s good! In the art world, we could all dance a little. Dancing’s fun.” This statements contrasts with the current Arts Project Australia exhibition, ‘Lets Dance’ where dance is the subject of some peoples anxieties. I don’t intend to discredit this, but quote is a means to convey a message.

Martin experienced a level of preciousness towards painting on a canvas, that he didn’t have with drawings on paper. A habit he broke through experimentation and adopting a level of fearlessness he could see within his clients/students at work.

With a background in Arts Therapy, Chris Martin had been (and possibly still is) in the presence of some rather great self taught artists. He felt their energetic channelling of creativity contrasted greatly to his formal arts training, causing a necessary rupture in his practise. His work environment provided an arena to experiment with alternative materials like pom-poms and metallic paint and glitter.

Chris Martin, Untitled, 2014
Untitled, 2014

He paints XXXL, creating what some consider ‘severe abstract’ space to mill around in, and when the mind wonders a touch, its still wonders within the XXXL canvas. Interestingly he considers himself a landscape painter, and includes what he views as a  horizon or ground line in each work.

Chris Martin you caught my eye because of your use of glitter, sheer scale, boldness and sense of journey within your work. I found you in this aptly named artspace.com article:

Glitter, Neon and Good Old Fashioned Paint: Three Abstract Painters Pushing the Medium Forward.

Chris_Martin_realEastate.jpg

The publication above reminds me of all the things I find interesting about some Chinese advertising: layout, scale, changeable font styles and colour combinations.

Featured Image from Artnet.com

Hyperallergic.com interview

Charlemagne Palestine + reading youtube comments

Charlemagne Palestine + reading youtube comments

A Youtube comment worth reading, “Open up four tabs with the music playing at the same time at different times for the ultimate experience”

I did it. it was amazing.

My first exploration into Charlemagne Palestine’s music, contemporary of Philip Glass, and Steve Reich – was the visceral ‘Body Music”, but this comment relates to ‘Strumming Music‘. A piano piece which builds, layer upon layer, loops, steps back and forth, it both hurries and relaxes all at the same time. Filling the space between the beat with a strumming technique where by a note seems to chase its tail, to whirl and spin around, shifting into the next.

What brought me to him was this…..

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Charlemagne Palestine at Kunsthalle Wien

But I think I like his music equally. Both immersive, both soft yet aggressive in their clustering or packing, both full of visual or sonic texture and colour.

I do know why the teddy bear developed as a motif, I’m interested in Charlemagne Palestine’s alignment with Animism more so than the bear itself.

The more I read about him, his interest in animism, his intention to exist on the outskirts, to not be considered an any ‘thing’ in particular, a rejection of categorisation. And also the fact that he was involved in the beginning of the CalArts school, much like Judy Chicago and a number of other artists I seem to be drawn too. I’m looking forward to investigating further and seeing who else appears with rebellious inclinations.

Heres a great interview on The Quietus

Continuo blog breaks down sound, here

 

kurt Schwitters – Merzbau

kurt Schwitters – Merzbau

I found myself in the process of marking my space in the studio. Taking control of how much light enters the space, I blocked out the light and created a suspended ceiling with curved sides.

It was an attempt to create a more appropriate space to assist in my projections. So I hope its suited to the job.

Kurt Schwitters created what he called his greatest living work, the ‘Merzbau’, a space with 3-D structures growing from the floor, ceiling and projecting out of the walls. In this altered space he created his so called merz paintings, and merz sculptures up until 1937.

Merz is a snippet of the German word for commerce, Commerz!

Image information: The Hannover Merzbau by Kurt Schwitters. Photo by Wilhelm Redemann, 1933. From MoMA website

 

Arts Project Australia – Steven Perrette

Arts Project Australia – Steven Perrette

ntiltilesOn the weekend I visited Art Project Australia’s current group show, Home and the Fabric of the Familiar,  and had a look at Laura Sheehan’s solo show too.

During researching this gallery and studio space I came across Steven Perrette. He loves trucks and cars it seems as much as me. I love the perspective, sense of movement and the energy that drove these works.

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At Night by the Southern Cross Station, Works on Paper
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Untitled, Works on Paper